Saturday, December 9, 2017

Abercrombie of Hancock Co,

Abercrombie of Hancock & Greene Co.'s
Find your Ancestors in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia

Monday, November 6, 2017

1/2 off 8 Genealogy Websites to Seniors!


Georgia Pioneers offers genealogy in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina,Tennessee and Virginia.  800M + records! Subscribe today to take advantage of this huge discount.


Jeannette Austin

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Old Georgia Schools and Their Masters #georgiapioneers


Old Georgia Schools 
Willow Springs SchoolPlantation or field schools were used to teach children, and later, students went abroad to universities in England. Proof of this is contained in the 2-set volume of Memoirs of Georgia publicized in 1895, where families were interviewed and extensive information was provided. If you think that educational materials were lacking, you are mistaken, for the children learned all of the basics: writing, reading, arithmetic. An examination of some old report cards in the mid 20th century reveal an intense study of the most basic subjects. In fact, the required subjects of the grammar and high schools of today compare poorly. By the time that colonial children completed the most rudimentary education, they were prepared to meet all the challenges of running their own farm or plantation, from architectural skills to a complex accounting system. 

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Friday, June 16, 2017

Brent Family of Monroe County added to #georgiapioneers

Thomas Young Brent Jr. married the widow of Dr. Wesley Clements (who died during the War Between the States). He lived with the family near Forsyth Georgia in the old Smith Plantation home, and died in the Confederate Home in Kentucky.

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Monday, January 23, 2017

Genealogists, Save Money if you Act Now



A Good Deal for Bloggers if you Act Now - Get More Genealogy Real Estate for the Money.

We are notifying all subscribers of this blog that we have a few slots open for 18-month subscriptions to 8 Genealogy
Websites (instead of 12 months). This includes genealogy databases in AL, GA, NC, SC, KY, VA, TN

If you are planning on joining, now is a good time.  These slots will not last long as you get 18 months instead of 
12 for the same rate.  Spaces will close as soon as they are filled so please act now.  18-months subscription

Your password will be sent after the receipt.

Jeannette Austin

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Peter Gruber of Austria to Georgia #history #genealogy

Peter Gruber

TaxenbachThe Catholic archbishop of Austria ordered all protestants out of the country in 1722. They had two weeks to pack up and leave. Several hundred Austrians roamed about Europe searching for homes. When General James Oglethorpe learned of the persecution, he welcomed these people into Georgia. However, by then, the numbers of homeless was diminished as they situated themselves around Europe, with only about 100 people remaining to emigrate. Maria Kraher emigrated to Georgia from Austria with her first husband, Hans Mosshammer. After he died, she was married to Peter Gruber in Ebenezer, Georgia, and after his death, married a third husband, Charles Floerl. Peter Gruber was born in Taxenbach, Berchtesgaden, Germany. Later on, the name was changed to Groover, especially as descendants moved into Bulloch County.

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Friday, September 30, 2016

More Genealogy Records Added for AL TN NC KY VA and GA

Join 8 Genealogy Websites and Find your Ancestors
Lots of new records added to AL, TN, NC, KY, VA and GA!
Details www.georgiapioneers.com/subscribe/subscribe.html


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Monday, August 29, 2016

William Few of Augusta #georgiapioneers #genealogy

Jeannette Holland AustinWilliam Few
By Jeannette Holland Austin

William Few, a resident of Maryland, came to Columbia County Georgia where he received bounty land grants in 1769 and 1781. While still in Maryland William Few and a brother associated themselves with the "Regulators", a group of frontiersmen who opposed the royal governor. As a result, the brother was hanged and the Few family farm was destroyed. Few Sr. was forced to move once again, this time to Georgia. William Jr. remained behind, helping to settle the affairs of his father, until 1776 when he joined his family near Wrightsboro, Georgia. About this time, he won admittance to the bar, based on earlier informal study, and set up practice in Augusta. William Few
William Few Jr. (1748-1828)

When the War for Independence began, Few embraced the Whig cause and beame a lieutenant-colonel in the dragoons. During 1776, he was elected to the Georgia provincial congress of 1776; and twice served in the assembly during 1777 and 1779. He also served in the Continental Congress (1780 to 1788) and was reelected to the Georgia Assembly. He served as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention and later became one of the first U. S. Senators from Georgia. When Few died in 1828 he was first buried in the yard of the local Reformed Dutch Church, later reinterred in the churchyard of St. Paul Church in Augusta.

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Thursday, August 25, 2016

The Tale of Thomas Ramsey

Jeannette Holland AustinEnduring to the End: The Story of the Escapades of Thomas Ramsey During the Revolutionary War
By Jeannette Holland Austin

The study of the pension record of Thomas Ramsey brings to question the number of miles he walked and the sufferings and hardships of the patriots during the Revolutionary War. Of course, all such pensions of worthy of reading, because these were our brave ancestors who sacrificed everything to provide a free America. Somewhere in those pensions are the true facts of our individual ancestors who made history. Forget about the history books written years afterwards by persons who were not participants and which only provide but a thin outline of sketchy facts.

Thomas Ramsey of Henry County first volunteered in 1775 militia in South Carolina, now Abbeville District under the command of Capt. James McCall. His unit marched to Ninety Six under Colonel Andrew Williamson and remained about two weeks when Colonel Robert Cunningham, afterwards General in the British service, came to attack. The troops quickly threw up a breastwork which they manned for two days before a cessation of war was agreed upon for twenty five days (November 1775). Afterwards, Capt. McCall was taken prisoner and Lieutenant Calhoun killed by the Indians. The command of the company devolved upon Ramsey who was in command during May of 1780 when Charleston was taken by the British army. As expressed in his pension, he had a choice. Either join the British, run away from the State or "lie out." He chose the latter and continued to hide until General Greene came through the back country a year later. He left his hiding place to to join Greene. He went with the company of Robert Cawther and beseiged Ninety-Six for five weeks until the British finally evacuated. Then, when General Greene marched to the east of Santee, private Ramsey followed General Pickens to Eutaw Springs where they were joined by the State Troops under Generals Marion and Sumpter where the battle occurred. The day before the Battle of Eutaw Springs commenced, two rifle companies were raised to protect the Horse (company) of Colonel Washington. Meanwhile, Colonel Pickens commanded Ramsey to be stationed on the right wing to the left of the enemy while his company remained in the battle until near dark, then retreat under a general order. However, General Pickens sent for Ramsey who accompaned him to General Greene where he was appointed the commander of sixty men to eye the movements of the enemy. Ramsey took his stand near the camp of the enemy where he remained burying the dead of both armies.

Battle of Kettle Creek
Battle of Kettle Creek February 14, 1779.

At the time of the battle of Kettle Creek, Thomas Ramsey, along with Charles Collins, D. Kate and George Barber were acting as spies to ascertain the number of Tories then under arms and were marching to Savannah. Ramsey stationed himself on the declivity of a hill on one side and George Barber on the declivity of the other side. The Tories were expected to pass on the top of the hill, which they did, except that they had about forty stragglers who had fallen behind. But Ramsey thought that they had all passed and returned to the trail. The stragglers passed within fifteen paces of Ramsey unobserved. To save himself, Ramsey stepped aside and hollowed out to them.

"Boys, what are you doing here? Colonel Boyd left me behind to tell you the rebels are close behind."

The Tories dashed off on their horses and left Ramsey safe. Then Barber asked him, " How did you escape?". Ramsey responded that "hell was never made for him!"
The rebels proceeded to overtake the stragglers, loosing fourteen men but finding forty seven of the Tories killed. British Colonel Boyd was wounded an died that evening. After that battle, Ramsey continued defending the frontier until March of 1782 when joined the militia and marched a to Bacons Bridge, twenty one miles from Charleston. He went on several scouting expeditions including through the Cherokee Nation over Cumberland Gap into the Tennessee Valley and down the river beds of that country to Cherokee villages.

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