Saturday, July 23, 2016

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Monday, May 30, 2016

William Franklin of Warren County, Georgia

Outerbanks, North Carolina
Anyone researching Georgia records understands how difficult it is to locate certain families. Especially those who migrated before the Revolutionary War.  Unless they were colonials who came with Oglethorpe,  without a pension from that war, it becomes a real chore to locate the origin of the family.  Rev. William Franklin established the Briar Creek Baptist Church in Washington, Georgia before the war.  He apparently came to Georgia with his son, George Thomas Franklin, born ca 1741 in Virginia.  Although there were land grants for Rev. Franklin, he was too old to have served in the Revolutionary War, and I have found no record whatsoever that either he nor George served.  Yet, genealogists claim that he served and enlisted in Botetourt County.  This reference came from the DAR eons of time ago and has no accuracy to it whatever, that I can see.  Yet, this one little statement has misled researchers. It is general knowledge that George Thomas Franklin was married to Vashti Mercer of the baptist Mercers from Currituck County, North Carolina.  Although no records exist in that county for the Franklin family, an in depth study of all Franklin names during the 1700s in Virginia has revealed an interesting fact.  In the late 17th century, one, Thomas Franklin, had a land patent in Currituck County.  This is Outerbanks, North Carolina, the Albemarle Sound, geographically close to Princess Anne County, Virginia.  In fact, I discovered a number of deeds of residents of Princess Anne County who also drew land in Currituck County.  Combined with family tradition that the Franklin's traveled with the Mercers from North Carolina into Georgia, as well as the era involved, it appears that Rev. Franklin was probably a son of the William Franklin who died intestate 1753 in Princess Anne County, Virginia. Another item of interest to researchers, is that while searching around Virginia Beach, they should also consider Lower Norfolk County and give especial consideration to the early deed records, which are rich with clues as to the old homesteads, etc. Virginia Pioneers

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Monday, February 29, 2016

#GA #Genealogy There is a Road to the Past




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Monday, February 22, 2016

Davis Smith Plantation (video)




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Monday, February 15, 2016

Asa Candler (video)




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Monday, February 8, 2016

Philip Delegal

Ft. Frederica, St. Simon's Island, Georgia
CAPT. PHILIP DELEGAL served with General Oglethorpe in the Colony, fighting the Spanish invaders throughout Georgia, as well as Florida. In a letter to James Oglethorpe dated August 14, 1735 from Philip Delegal, South Carolina, Ft. Frederick: 
"I received the letter you honored me with dated the 16th of May last...I take leave to give you my hearty thanks for so great a favor. I have not words sufficient to express myself how much I am obliged to your honor...if it should happen any discrepancies in the Colony and that he give (Mr. Causton) me timely notice, I shall be ready to do him all the service in my power both by acting and threatening the mutineers, nothwithstanding that I am directly under the command of the Governor of South Carolina, no man being more willing to serve the Colony than myself. I do not think it proper to ask the Governor's approbation in assisting your Colony upon so critical a time by reason there is a dispute between the South Carolina agent and the Indian nation and your agent about the trade, but as soon as I have opportunity I shall not fail to write to him, wishing for nothing more than to be able to give you the most convincing proof thereof. Philip Delegal. P. S.  My son is at present in the country or else he did not himself the honor to have wrote to you."

From the Journal of William Stephens, Secretary of the Colony for many years, who reported regularly all the business of Georgia to the Trustees in England:
"11 January 1738. A boat sent by Lt. Delegal at St. Simon's for Charles Town here in the morning and brought several letters; among others from Capt. Gascoigne, Mr. Horton, and Mr. Hawkins, for me.... 

2 February 1738. Thursday. Lt. Delegal in the morning crossed Jekyll Sound from his fort on St. Simon's and paid us a visit. Mr. Horton then did not allow us to put out without dining with him, which I perceived he had made provision for, and we fared well. Afterwards, Mr. Delegal took his leave and returned to his fort."


 "15 December 1740. The person on the boat who did not show himself yesterday we now            heard was Colonel Barnwell of Carolina, to whom the General (Oglethorpe) had been friendly with; and it was not doubted but both he and Lt. Delegal had with them some particular orders and instructions from his Excellency." (At the seige of Augustine by General Oglethorpe) 

Capt. Delegal served in Lt. General Parson's Regiment of Invalids, St. Peter's Port, on the Island of Guernsey, until he became active in the politics of His Majesty. December 19, 1751 he was granted 500 acres, adjoining that of his son. In 1755 he returned to the Legislature representing the Great and Little Ogeechee District, being elected a Member of the House. In 1757 he carried a bill to the Council to prevent any person from trading or encouraging Indians to come into Georgia.  When Capt. Delegal died in January of 1769, his wife, Eleanor, removed herself to reside at Philip's Bluff in South Carolina. 


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Monday, February 1, 2016

Thomas Lee, one of the first blacksmiths to Georgia

THOMAS LEE, SR. came to Georgia as a Trust servant for ten years, having embarked May 14, 1735. After his servitude, in February of 1759 he was granted 200 acres in Augusta on Williams Creek about 50 miles from Augusta and 40 miles from the mouth of the Little River.  A deed (
Colonial Deed Book C-I, page 396-397) records a deed from Isaac and Mary Trippe, cordwainer of Savannah, to Thomas Lee, blacksmith, Savannah, 100 acres in Newport District, bounded northeast by Lachlan McIntosh.  In December of 1760 he possessed 200 acres above Augusta and was ordered to vacate his land by proclamation because of the menacing indians in that area. He then petitioned for 300 acres, 35 miles above Augusta, where James Mathews formerly had a small settlement.  In October of 1770, Thomas Lee was granted 400 acres in St. Phillips Parish, Chatham County.  

WILLIAM LEE, a brother to Thomas Lee, Sr., late of Barbadoes, petitioned on February 4, 1755 for 1800 acres of land, stating that he had a wife and two children, and three servants and 28 negroes on his property. By his brothers will (Thomas), he was left two lots in St. Philip's Parish containing 650 acres. Deed Book C-I, Colonial Deeds, William Lee, Gentleman,Savannah to James and Elizabeth Rutherford, silvers of Savannah, July 18, 1755, a Town Lot in Savannah, Slopes Tything, Percival Ward, No. 3, and five acres, garden lot, west of town; 44 acres and 7/8 acre called farm lot. Wife, Charity, who died August 29, 1799, Richmond Co., Ga. 

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Monday, January 25, 2016

Land Swindle in Georgia

Drumbo, county Down in Ireland.  "The Tower"
While James Edward Oglethorpe was planting settlers in the Colony of Georgia, advertisements were being distributed in England encouraging settlement of so fair a land.  Meanwhile, Joe Rae of Maghrenock near Ballnahigh in County Down, Nova Scotia, emigrated to South Carolina ca 1729 or 1730 and applied for extensive land grants in Georgia because of his connections in North Ireland. Initially, he was granted 50,000 acres on the Ogeechee River in Queensborough (now Burke County, Georgia), 40 miles from Augusta, for his countrymen or friends. Then he started publishing letters in Belfast to acquire purchasers.  Two of his letters asking for settlers appeared in the Belfast News Letter in 1765. At this time, he was sending 100 pounds to educate the children of his dead brother and invited his countrymen to share in great fortune, guaranteeing the free use of cattle and horses for five years. But it was hiis brother, Matthew Rea, who financed the arrangements for the voyage, on the Prince of Wales to sail in 1765 from Belfast to Charleston with passengers, thence to Savannah. The ship sailed in February. Matthew Rea was a land promotor for America, and lived in the Village of Drumbo in County Down, and was either a small landowner or farmer. He had the means to undertake two tours of the surrounding countryside in furtherance of his emigration plans, acting as middleman in the emigration trade, and agent, working with his brother, John Rea, in Georgia to obtain emigrants to the Colony. 

As far as this land business was concerned, John Rea was described as a scoundrel in a letter published in 1770 describing georgia as "a woeful place...a poor hole...accursed place...inhabited by a few Irish and some run-aways from all parts of America...that John Rea was more concerned with erecting a hedge between himself and the indians than with promoting the happiness of his settlers". As the ship "Waddell" sailed in November of 1773, Mathew's activities on behalf of Georgia and his brother came to an end. 

John Rae was a resident of Georgia in August of 1741, where he was appointed Conservator of the Peace ten years later. In 1752, he petitioned the Georgia Trustees for 300 acres on Argyle Island on the Savannah River and 100 acres on Pipemaker's Creek. In 1755, he was elected Representative to sit in the Assembly for Georgia at Augusta, and a lot was granted to him at Hardwick, in Chatham County.  In behalf of his settlement efforts, he petitioned for relief for building a Church at Augusta in 1756, and received it. In February of 1768, he petitioned for lands on the Ogeechee River to be reserved for three years, in hopes of getting Irish settlers there. He printed ccopies of law and sent this to friends in Ireland, but the encouragement was much less than what was being given to South Carolina settlers, for in that State, free passage was provided, as well as other advantages. His friends wrote they would come to Georgia only if their passage was paid and they had use of lands free of expense and were exempted from taxes for ten years. The Georgia Trustees granted this wish to the Irish potentials, calling it "An Act for Encouraging Settlers to Come into the Province." 

John Rea, however, was very active in His Majesty's affairs, trying to obtain settlers for the Augusta area. He was Commissioner at Augusta, Collector and Assessor, in charge of erecting forts, printed the laws, built churches, and was in charge of building barracks for the soldiers. John Rea lived on 200 acres on Stony Creek, three miles above Augusta, adjoining the lands of George Galphin, where he had a grist mill. In April of 1765, he petitioned for land originally surveyed for Isaac Barksdale to his widow, but the lands were passed in the name of John Rae, Jr.  Rea had a negro slave, Nero, who was convicted in 1772 of felony, for breaking open a store of rice and taking several barrels. Ten other slaves were also discovered in the records, however there were probably a good deal more slaves who cultivated his lands. 

In 1771, John Rae, the first brother to come to the Colony,  was convicted of the manslaughter of Mrs. Ann Simpson, at Savannah, but was later pardoned. All his friends petitioned in his behalf, stating that he had been in the province for nearly forty years and had an unblemished character and had filled many offices of public trust. He has also been a Member of the Georgia Assembly, which was a very highly respected position in the province.  John Rae finally died in Augusta in 1784.  


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Monday, January 18, 2016

Mackay from Scotland

Durness, Scotland

JOHN MACKAY was born 1679 Durness, Scotland, which is on the northwestern tip of Scotland. He was a farmer who embarked for America on Oct. 20, 1735, arriving in Savannah, Georgia on January 10, 1736.  The wife, Jannett, and children are listed on the passenger list. 

Historical Collections of Georgia by White, p. 332, provides an Account of the Orphans and Children which were maintained and educated Orphan House at Georgia, known as Betheseda Orphanace. Upon the death of John Mackay in 1739, two his children are listed as orphans.  One son, Hugh Mackay, was a Lieutenant in the Rangers of General Oglethorpe; a daughter died at Sunbury, Georgia, and the two sons, William and Mackay were placed out as apprentices to Thomas Salter, bricklayers, and James Papott, a Savannah carpenter.

Ref: Page 86, A List of Early Settlers of Georgia by Coulter.


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Monday, January 11, 2016

Colonel Kenneth Baillie

Ft. Augustine, FL where Baillie was taken prisoner
COLONEL KENNETH BAILLIE, farmer in England, born 1715, embarked from England to Colony of Georgia October 20, 1736, arriving January 10, 1736. He was part of a voyage from the Glen of Stralbdean, Inverness (the Highlands) of Scotland who sailed on the ship Prince of Wales, Capt. George Dunbar, Skipper. The Scots were brought over to establish a fort in McIntosh Co., (Ft. George), and to fight the Spanish. Oglethorpe was impressed with Highlanders who knew how to fight in the woods. The Spanish Indians were constantly raiding, plundering and were on the warpath. He established himself as a planter of a rice plantation, also having timber lands and two lots at Sunbury. He owned over 1,000 acres of land on St. Mary's Island, his home stood overlooking the Midway River, and he called this place Baillie's Island

In 1742, while an Ensign to the Darien Company of Rangers who, while General Oglethorpe was planning an attack on Augustine, were catptured by the Spanish and taken to Ft. Moosa. The planned attack failed. So, Ensign Baillie was taken prisoner and carried off by the Spaniards to Old Spain, but escaped from there, and returned to England. While in England, he appeared before the Trustees and made a report on the seige of Augustine. He said that the attack would have succeeded had it not been for the captains of the boats who did not capture Spanish vessels to prevent the Spanish from coming into Augustine with provisions and guns. He also report on the conditions of the soil and the complaints made by settlers for not being permitted negro slaves. When asked how he felt on the matter, he said that the Colony did not need slaves as long as the Spanish and Indians were threatening the settlements. Georgia was not supposed to have rum, but at Augusta, an indian trading post just south of the South Carolina border, rum was readily sold, and negro slaves were used on the plantations. Baillie was completely in favor of rum, and told the Trustees that he thought it was wholesome for the Colony. 

Colonel Kenneth Baillie died Sept. 1766 in Georgia. His LWT dated 7/7/1766, probated 9/2/1766, St. John's Parish. He bequeathed large tracts of land to his sons, as well as timber land in Sunbury, Georgia. This traced genealogy is available to members of Georgia Pioneers 

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Monday, January 4, 2016

The First Puritans to Georgia

Midway with graves of the first settlers to Midway, GA
Puritans, MICHAEL and JOANNA BACON, born ca 1670, migrated from England to Pennsylvania, then to Dorchester, South Carolina, and were the founders of the movement in Liberty Co., Ga. Their minister had acquired large land grants for his congregation in Liberty Co., at Midway.  The South Carolina Governor was a factor in encouragine Puritans to move into Georgia, because he said that there was a great opportunity in the Colony and fertile lands.  The first minister in Midway was Rev. Osgood and the old Puritan Church at Midway, Georgia still stands. Midway is half way between Darien and Savannah. It's cemetery which is across the street from the church building, houses its original settlers.  Across the street is the cemetery of the emigrants from Dorchester, South Carolina. The Bacon lineage is traced and available to members of Georgia Pioneers (In the Library, click on "Colonial".  The Bacons Puritans was industrious persons as well as religious and built a thriving community in Liberty County after 1752, when the Trustees surrendered the Charter to King George. The homeplace was situated on the Midway River. A son, Thomas, petitioned for 500 acres of land on Little Mortar, stating that he had a wife and eleven slaves.
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